It is currently 20 Oct 2019 00:32

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: 26 Apr 2015 00:02 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2013 10:59
Posts: 661
Nick Allen, Los Angeles 11:05PM BST 23 Apr 2015 reports:

Surgeons have found and removed an embryonic twin, complete with hair bone and teeth, from deep in the brain of a PhD computer science student.
Yamini Karanam 26, had been experiencing health problems for some time, including trouble with concentrating and reading, and eventually walking.
After seeing a series of neurologists and neurosurgeons across the United States she was diagnosed with a tumour on the pineal gland in her brain.
Miss Karanam, from Hyderabad, India, was studying at a college in Indiana.

On her blog she described having "problems with reading comprehension, listening comprehension. If a couple of people were talking in a room, I wouldn't understand what was happening." She said it had been frustrating as doctors could not establish what was wrong.
"The neurologist would say the neurosurgeon is not being practical in your case. And the neurosurgeon would say the neurologist is not being optimistic in your case," she said. "And I'm like, could someone be educated about this?

"Months and weeks slipped through my fingers. There weren’t any diagnostic procedures left to run. Consultations followed procedures but nobody said anything useful."

Her friends raised $32,000 which helped pay for surgery by Dr Hrayr Shahinian at the Skull Base Institute in Los Angeles, who performed radical keyholse surgery using fiber optic technology. That allowed him to discover that she had a "teratoma" - a rare unborn twin - insider her. Dr Shahinian said he had removed up to 8,000 brain tumours and it was only the second teratoma he had seen. Miss Karanam told NBC she believed it was an "evil twin sister who's been torturing me for the past 26 years".

In 2009 Gavin Hyatt, a British plumber, had an embryonic twin spill out of his stomach. Medics said the 4cm growth was a parasitic twin that had died in the womb early in their mother's pregnancy.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: 26 Apr 2015 23:26 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2013 13:13
Posts: 170
Hi Badri
It is an amazing story. But I need certain clarifications. In an advanced set up once the patient reached a tertiary centre they could have easily diagnosed her problem with the latest imaging procedures. The surgeon would have known before the surgery that there was a tumour on the pineal gland in her brain. It is not like exploring abdomen for diagnosis and treatment. In the case of brain tumour you have to locate first before thinking of surgery. Of course that the tumour contained an embryonic twin was a surprise. But where was the need for the patient to lament about the inability of neurologists and neurosurgeons not able to help her. Where was the necessity for seeing a series of neurologists and neurosurgeons across the United States? She was telling that it had been frustrating as doctors could not establish what was wrong. I simply could not digest her statement "Months and weeks slipped through my fingers. There weren’t any diagnostic procedures left to run. Consultations followed procedures but nobody said anything useful."

One last question. Was the case reported by the surgeons themselves in an authentic journal?

UA Mohammed


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: 27 Apr 2015 00:19 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2013 10:59
Posts: 661
Mohammed,

Two things about this report that attracted my attention. 1, Even in an advanced country like USA doctors can brush aside serious symptoms as imaginary. 2, I am always amazed when a tiny little tumour deep in the brain is removed successfully by these extraordinary specialists without leaving a residual deficit.

This report has not appeared in any medical journal as far as I know. The Skull Base Institute in LA is fairly well known and Dr Shahinian appears to be a well known surgeon. He was interviewed by NBC and that was the reason the information got to the news media. He informed them that specialists disagreed on the source of the problem and whether something could be done. Karanam's investigations led her to Dr. Hrayr Shahinian of the Skull Base Institute in Los Angeles. Shahinian pioneers minimally invasive techniques for removing brain tumors.

Dr Shahinian explained that this type of brain surgery had been performed thousands of times, what Shahinian found when he removed Karanam's tumor gave him the opportunity to bring it to prominence.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron