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PostPosted: 10 Aug 2020 20:24 
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Incidence of Stress Cardiomyopathy During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic

Question Is psychological, social, and economic stress associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) associated with the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy?

Findings
This cohort study included 1914 patients with acute coronary syndrome to compare patients presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic with patients presenting across 4 timelines prior to the pandemic and found a significantly increased incidence of 7.8% of stress cardiomyopathy during the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with prepandemic incidences that ranged from 1.5% to 1.8%.


Meaning These findings suggest that psychological, social, and economic stress related to the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with an increased incidence of stress cardiomyopathy.

To determine the incidence and outcomes of stress cardiomyopathy during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before the pandemic.

Design, Setting, and Participants This retrospective cohort study at cardiac catheterization laboratories with primary percutaneous coronary intervention capability at 2 hospitals in the Cleveland Clinic health system in Northeast Ohio examined the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy (also known as Takotsubo syndrome) in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome who underwent coronary arteriography
. Patients presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic, between March 1 and April 30, 2020, were compared with 4 control groups of patients with acute coronary syndrome presenting prior to the pandemic across 4 distinct timelines: March to April 2018, January to February 2019, March to April 2019, and January to February 2020. Data were analyzed in May 2020.

Exposures Patients were divided into 5 groups based on the date of their clinical presentation in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Main Outcomes and Measures Incidence of stress cardiomyopathy.

Results

There was a significant increase in the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy during the COVID-19 period, with a total of 20 patients with stress cardiomyopathy (incidence proportion, 7.8%), compared with prepandemic timelines, which ranged from 5 to 12 patients with stress cardiomyopathy (incidence proportion range, 1.5%-1.8%).[/color] The rate ratio comparing the COVID-19 pandemic period to the combined prepandemic period was 4.58 (95% CI, 4.11-5.11; P < .001).
Patients with stress cardiomyopathy during the COVID-19 pandemic had a longer median (interquartile range) hospital length of stay compared with those hospitalized in the prepandemic period (COVID-19 period:
There were no significant differences between the COVID-19 period and the overall pre–COVID-19 period in mortality or 30-day rehospitalization

Conclusions and Relevance
This study found that there was a significant increase in the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy during the COVID-19 pandemic when compared with prepandemic periods.


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PostPosted: 29 Aug 2020 12:23 
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One of the reports indicated that the sudden release of stress hormones, such as norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine, “stuns” the heart. Stunning the heart triggers changes in heart muscle cells leading to weakening of the left ventricular muscle.

Another study done a few years ago (pre COVID) suggested that 90% of the cases occurred in women. Do we know how this compares with the present study?


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PostPosted: 29 Aug 2020 16:21 
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You are correct in Women having a higher incidence of Takotsubo(Also mentioned in my article on the the condition-part2)

The current Covid time study detail is below, with NO difference in sex incidence.

The COVID-19 period cohort included 258 patients admitted from March to April 2020. There were no significant differences between groups in the median age (pre–COVID-19 period: 67 [59-74] years vs COVID-19 period: 67 [57-75] years; P = .56) or sex (pre–COVID-19 period: 1064 [66.1%] men vs COVID-19 period: 175 [67.8%] men; P = .43).

Thank you for the queery


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